Read e-book online Ain't Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the PDF

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By Zoe A. Colley

ISBN-10: 0813042410

ISBN-13: 9780813042411

An exploration of the influence on imprisonment of people excited about the Civil Rights move as an entire.

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31 The imprisonment of the protesters appears to have shaken the CORE membership, which acted nervously in the face of arrest. White members of CORE—which comprised around sixty percent of the membership—were warned to stay away from the NAACP office for fear that their presence might incite violence. ”32 Further protests did not take place until March 12, when integrated groups of students descended upon the lunch counters at Woolworth’s and McCrory’s. The protest in McCrory’s ended when the lunch counter was closed, but in Woolworth’s the six students were arrested.

Over the following three years, King and his newly formed organization, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, continued to discuss how they could move beyond the lessons learned in Montgomery. While a number of nonviolent protests took place, the SCLC’s early years were far from a time of innovation in civil rights protest. King and his organization remained in a nonviolent no-man’s-land during the late 1950s: deeply dedicated to nonviolence, yet unsure how to secure the mass involvement of African Americans.

Will . . ”10 The memorandum was a natural conclusion to the national office’s ongoing objections to bail rejection. Whether SNCC, CORE, or the SCLC were aware of this policy statement is unclear, but presumably it would not have come as a surprise. 48 | Ain’t Scared of Your Jail Ironically, at the same time that the NAACP was moving to cement a “bail not jail” policy, CORE was planning a campaign against segregated travel facilities that would make the vision of filling southern jails with hundreds of nonviolent protesters a reality.

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Ain't Scared of Your Jail: Arrest, Imprisonment, and the Civil Rights Movement by Zoe A. Colley


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