Aquaculture, Second edition - download pdf or read online

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  • March 16, 2018
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By John S. Lucas, Paul C. Southgate(eds.)

ISBN-10: 1118687930

ISBN-13: 9781118687932

ISBN-10: 1405188588

ISBN-13: 9781405188586

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Extra resources for Aquaculture, Second edition

Example text

The cages are located within a very ‘friendly’ environment and are accessed easily from the pond wall or a floating walkway. 2. Lakes, estuaries or protected bays. These cages tend to be much larger (10–40 m diameter) and are secured to the bottom of the waterway by anchoring lines. The forces associated with these environments are greater than those found in ponds as a result of tidal currents, wind-generated waves (<1 m) and swells. Again, these cages are easily accessed from shore or by a short trip in a small powerboat.

This is an important factor in developing nations, where aquaculture products are valued as a major source of animal protein and are cultured for food security rather than export trade. With the exception of aquaculture of species such as shrimp, which are directed at international markets, most aquaculture in developing countries is derived from extensive or semi-intensive culture based on species that feed low in the food chain (Fig. 8A). Not only is it inefficient to produce carnivorous species through a multilevel food chain, but productivity will be very poor per unit area or volume from such extensive or semi-intensive systems.

5 m deep) and are secured to stakes driven into the bottom of shallow ponds. The cages are located within a very ‘friendly’ environment and are accessed easily from the pond wall or a floating walkway. 2. Lakes, estuaries or protected bays. These cages tend to be much larger (10–40 m diameter) and are secured to the bottom of the waterway by anchoring lines. The forces associated with these environments are greater than those found in ponds as a result of tidal currents, wind-generated waves (<1 m) and swells.

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Aquaculture, Second edition by John S. Lucas, Paul C. Southgate(eds.)


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